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phillip-banks:

father and son
high resolution →

phillip-banks:

father and son

bogleech:

Speaking of Deviantart trolls-or-are-they horror did you guys know there are multiple accounts there devoted entirely to stealing photos of pregnant women and overlaying text indicating that their distended stomachs are the result of engulfing and digesting children?

Look at this one. Look at the story someone added to some poor woman’s photo. A story about how she fell down the stairs and accidentally swallowed her teenage son on the way down.

Like…

image

juliajm15:

thesilvereye:

View the fullsize tutorial on DA | The most handy hair structure tutorials are this video by Proko and thisblog post.These are useful for thinking about the direction hair locks flow with different styles: 1 2 3 4 5 | Painting Realistic Hair | Shading with gradients: 1 2 | Tutorials by me including: Gimp Brush Dynamics, Coloring Eyes and Coloring Method.

All example characters are fromThe Silver Eye webcomic!

Bless you for this *—-*

witnesstheabsurd:

SLIFER THE SKY DRAGON  
{ オシリスの天空竜 }
"The heavens twist and thunder roars, signaling the coming of this ancient creature, and the dawn of true power."
high resolution →

witnesstheabsurd:

SLIFER THE SKY DRAGON  

{ オシリスの天空竜 }

"The heavens twist and thunder roars, signaling the coming of this ancient creature, and the dawn of true power."

1 hour ago
3,074 notes
Reblog

+ yugioh

pixelatedcrown:

I think I’ve decided on what meals I want the player to be able to make in-game! one of them being this, an english breakfast :O minus the mushrooms and black pudding because I’m just now realising I forgot to add them in

jaramo:

heyo!
don’t worry, your english turned out fine, dude.

as a foreword of warning,
it is best that you don’t use this post as a standalone tutorial, 
instead, try to use it as a study aid to help you make sense of real-life references.
(same applies for any decent “art tutorial” out there, really. :p)

bolded numbers correspond to the numbers on this post’s pictures.

Read More

lordsoul-ibshall sent: You are a grand inspiration, i just love your style! How did you start off promoting yourself as an artist?

ilikelookingatnakedmen:

ricardobessa:

Aw, thank you. Ok, I always feel like my replies are too wordy, so have some bullet points:

  1. Social Media: like it or not, it’s useful. I’m on several websites, some are primary (I try to participate actively most days), some are secondary (I just try to keep them updated, check them periodically). Release your work into the wild.
  2. E-mails: I wasn’t quite aware in the beginning that you’re supposed to keep sending them even if you don’t get any replies. If you want to work for someone, keep sending them updates (not too often! Every few months, or when relevant). They might reply one day.
  3. Postcards (or other nice souvenirs): see above. Follow up with an e-mail within a week, max two.
  4. Research: necessary for 2 and 3. People have to know you exist in order to hire you, but you have to know THEY exist if you’re getting in touch with them.
  5. Be nice. Really, be generally nice to people, online or offline. You never know who’s going to become a person who hires illustrators. Also, just be nice because.
  6. Be persistent. Not irresponsible-annoying-inconvenient-persistent. Nice-level-headed-persistent. Although who knows, you wouldn’t believe how many people got started on their careers by doing something crazy or lying to someone.
  7. Do quality work. Probably the most important? Keep doing your thing and putting it out there, even if you’re not getting paid work. It should be obvious, but you’d be surprised at how many people don’t quite grasp the concept and think a degree entitles them to a career.
  8. Be aware that there isn’t one formula. Everything I wrote above is the generic, cookie-cutter points you’ll generally hear, but there are a thousand people who’ll tell you a thousand different things. Forge your own path (frankly, you have no choice).

applicable to writers, musicians and everyone else as well

mayorstarfish:

Today I visited the punny town of Pawsome!

Address: 5800 - 4337 - 9458

First of all, I love seeing modern towns. I don’t see it being done as often and I just adore the way it looks. I really loved how the town had many city-like areas, but also had very calm and beautiful places to relax. All the characters had cute puns and I really loved the playground. If you’re looking for somewhere different to visit, be sure to drop by.

delcat:

unexplained-events:

Franco Banfi

A swiss diver, captured these pictures of one of the six anacondas he saw on his 10 day trip to Mato Grosso in Brazil. This one was about 26-feet long.

"At the first moment it’s scary because you don’t know the animal and everybody says it’s dangerous. ‘But after a while you understand that nothing happens if you respect the snake. ‘I have never been so close to a snake like this before. But I think a small poisonous snake is more scary than a big one. At least you can see the anacondas clearly and know what they’re doing." - Franco Banfi

These snakes are too big.  Not because they’re scary, but because I’m not hugging them right now.

1 day ago
24,549 notes
Reblog

+ same
+ snakes

quinncy:

raven-blood-13:

Reference from this image

Just a painting practice, since I really enjoyed that photo and wanted to try working with such a layered eye.  Not incredibly accurate, but I wasn’t so much going for making it exact, just learning from it.  This was a really fun exercise, but I’m not sure of the true source for the photo, if anyone can give me an actual source for the photographer, I’ll link them.  

I believe THIS is actually the real source. Can’t be 100% sure

1 day ago
55 notes
Reblog

anatomicalart:

Quickest way to improvement? Practice. It’s a simple bit of advice that rings with absolute truth. Articles, tips, mentors, and study will never get you as far as rolling up your sleeves and getting down to work, be it animation or any other skill. Today we’ve compiled a list of exercises, like animation push-ups, that will get your art skills buff and toned.
Maybe you still need convinced of how important the “Art of Doing” is? Look no further than the early days of animation, especially at the Disney studio. Here were a group of animators (before being an animator was even a thing) who HAD no books to read, or websites to visit, or even experienced animators to ask. They learned via the age old art of hands-on training, experimenting and discovering as they went. And some would argue they created some of the greatest animation to ever be seen. Masterpieces like the dwarfs dancing in Snow White or the terror of the Monstro scene in Pinocchio. So be like them! Get out there and do animation!

Some of these exercises you may have done or seen before; some maybe not. Consider doing each of them, even if you did once previously, because returning to an old exercise to see how much you’ve progressed is a very valuable experience.
Level 1 Exercises
(Do not discount their simplicity! Here you have the principals of animation, which all other animation is built on. They are worth your time and effort.)
Ball Bouncing in place, no decay (loop)
Ball Bouncing across the screen
Brick falling from a shelf onto the ground
Simple character head turn
Character head turn with anticipation
Character blinking
Character thinking [tougher than it sounds!]
Flour Sack waving (loop)
Flour Sack jumping
Flour Sack falling (loop or hitting the ground)
Flour Sack kicking a ball
Level 2 Exercises
Change in Character emotion (happy to sad, sad to angry, etc.)
Character jumping over a gap
Standing up (from a chair)
Walk Cycle [oldie but goodie!]
Character on a pogo stick (loop)
Laughing
Sneezing
Reaching for an object on a shelf overhead
Quick motion smear/blur
Taking a deep breath [also tougher than it sounds!]
A tree falling
Character being hit by something simple (ball, brick, book)
Run Cycle
Level 3 Exercises
Close up of open hand closing into fist
Close up of hand picking up a small object
Character lifting a heavy object (with purpose!)
Overlapping action (puffy hair, floppy ears, tail)
Character painting
Hammering a nail
Stirring a soup pot and tasting from a spoon
Character blowing up a balloon
Character juggling (loop)
Scared character peering around a corner
Zipping up a jacket
Licking and sealing an envelope
Standing up (from the ground)
Pressing an elevator button and waiting for it
Starting to say something but unsure of how
Level 4 Exercises
Character eating a cupcake
Object falling into a body of water
Two characters playing tug-of-war
Character dealing a deck of cards out
The full process of brushing one’s teeth
A single piece of paper dropping through the air
Run across screen with change in direction
Sleeping character startled by alarm then returning to sleepy state
Opening a cupboard and removing something inside
Putting on a pair of pants
Opening the “world’s best gift” and reacting
Any of the above exercises using a very heavy character/object next to a very light character/object. Enhance the differences the weight change makes!
Things to keep in mind:
Reading these exercises will do as much for you as reading about push-ups would do for your physical muscles: NOTHING. If you want the benefit, you must animate them. Take a deep breath and just do it.
Do not forget the famous words of Ollie Johnston: “You’re not supposed to animate drawings [3D models]. You’re supposed to animate feelings.” If a character isn’t thinking, they aren’t alive, and the animation has failed.
Keep it simple! There is no reason to over complicate any of these exercises. Going back to push-ups, would push-ups be harder if while doing them you also recited the Gettysburg Address? Yes. Would they be any more beneficial? No. Keep things nice and simple and clear.
Do your best. There is no reason to do these exercises poorly. Give it your all. You don’t have to show anyone, these are for you. You owe it to yourself to try your very best. Something not quite right? Take the time to fix it.
As always, have fun. Push ups are not fun. Animation is supposed to be. Be joyful in your work!
Have any questions about the exercises above? Leave a comment below and we’ll answer them the best we can! Someone else may be wondering the exact same thing, so you’ll help them too. Likewise if someone is looking for possible exercises, why not share a link to these and give them a hand?

Article featured on AnimatorIsland.com [Source]Article composed by J.K. RIKIMARCH 18, 2013Follow @AnimatorIsland on Twitter for more updates tips and tricks.
high resolution →

anatomicalart:

Quickest way to improvement? Practice. It’s a simple bit of advice that rings with absolute truth. Articles, tips, mentors, and study will never get you as far as rolling up your sleeves and getting down to work, be it animation or any other skill. Today we’ve compiled a list of exercises, like animation push-ups, that will get your art skills buff and toned.

Maybe you still need convinced of how important the “Art of Doing” is? Look no further than the early days of animation, especially at the Disney studio. Here were a group of animators (before being an animator was even a thing) who HAD no books to read, or websites to visit, or even experienced animators to ask. They learned via the age old art of hands-on training, experimenting and discovering as they went. And some would argue they created some of the greatest animation to ever be seen. Masterpieces like the dwarfs dancing in Snow White or the terror of the Monstro scene in Pinocchio. So be like them! Get out there and do animation!

image

Some of these exercises you may have done or seen before; some maybe not. Consider doing each of them, even if you did once previously, because returning to an old exercise to see how much you’ve progressed is a very valuable experience.

Level 1 Exercises

(Do not discount their simplicity! Here you have the principals of animation, which all other animation is built on. They are worth your time and effort.)

  1. Ball Bouncing in place, no decay (loop)
  2. Ball Bouncing across the screen
  3. Brick falling from a shelf onto the ground
  4. Simple character head turn
  5. Character head turn with anticipation
  6. Character blinking
  7. Character thinking [tougher than it sounds!]
  8. Flour Sack waving (loop)
  9. Flour Sack jumping
  10. Flour Sack falling (loop or hitting the ground)
  11. Flour Sack kicking a ball
Level 2 Exercises
  1. Change in Character emotion (happy to sad, sad to angry, etc.)
  2. Character jumping over a gap
  3. Standing up (from a chair)
  4. Walk Cycle [oldie but goodie!]
  5. Character on a pogo stick (loop)
  6. Laughing
  7. Sneezing
  8. Reaching for an object on a shelf overhead
  9. Quick motion smear/blur
  10. Taking a deep breath [also tougher than it sounds!]
  11. A tree falling
  12. Character being hit by something simple (ball, brick, book)
  13. Run Cycle
Level 3 Exercises
  1. Close up of open hand closing into fist
  2. Close up of hand picking up a small object
  3. Character lifting a heavy object (with purpose!)
  4. Overlapping action (puffy hair, floppy ears, tail)
  5. Character painting
  6. Hammering a nail
  7. Stirring a soup pot and tasting from a spoon
  8. Character blowing up a balloon
  9. Character juggling (loop)
  10. Scared character peering around a corner
  11. Zipping up a jacket
  12. Licking and sealing an envelope
  13. Standing up (from the ground)
  14. Pressing an elevator button and waiting for it
  15. Starting to say something but unsure of how
Level 4 Exercises
  1. Character eating a cupcake
  2. Object falling into a body of water
  3. Two characters playing tug-of-war
  4. Character dealing a deck of cards out
  5. The full process of brushing one’s teeth
  6. A single piece of paper dropping through the air
  7. Run across screen with change in direction
  8. Sleeping character startled by alarm then returning to sleepy state
  9. Opening a cupboard and removing something inside
  10. Putting on a pair of pants
  11. Opening the “world’s best gift” and reacting
  12. Any of the above exercises using a very heavy character/object next to a very light character/object. Enhance the differences the weight change makes!
Things to keep in mind:
  • Reading these exercises will do as much for you as reading about push-ups would do for your physical muscles: NOTHING. If you want the benefit, you must animate them. Take a deep breath and just do it.
  • Do not forget the famous words of Ollie Johnston: “You’re not supposed to animate drawings [3D models]. You’re supposed to animate feelings.” If a character isn’t thinking, they aren’t alive, and the animation has failed.
  • Keep it simple! There is no reason to over complicate any of these exercises. Going back to push-ups, would push-ups be harder if while doing them you also recited the Gettysburg Address? Yes. Would they be any more beneficial? No. Keep things nice and simple and clear.
  • Do your best. There is no reason to do these exercises poorly. Give it your all. You don’t have to show anyone, these are for you. You owe it to yourself to try your very best. Something not quite right? Take the time to fix it.
  • As always, have fun. Push ups are not fun. Animation is supposed to be. Be joyful in your work!

Have any questions about the exercises above? Leave a comment below and we’ll answer them the best we can! Someone else may be wondering the exact same thing, so you’ll help them too. Likewise if someone is looking for possible exercises, why not share a link to these and give them a hand?

Article featured on AnimatorIsland.com 
[Source]
Article composed by J.K. RIKI
MARCH 18, 2013
Follow @AnimatorIsland on Twitter for more updates tips and tricks.

plays

thefreshprinceofjunes:

I REMEMBERED THIS VIDEO EXISTED SO I WENT TO GO FIND IT

AND THEN I REALIZED IT WAS MADE BY THE SAME PERSON WHO DID THE MOONBASE ALPHA VIDEOS

1 day ago
6,159 notes
Reblog

sadisticbrit:

flight rising is a plague
high resolution →

sadisticbrit:

flight rising is a plague

plays

vargskelethor:

I broke Sims again, I’m sorry.

1 day ago
1,548 notes
Reblog

+ vinesauce

giddytf2:

sizvideos:

Parrotlet vs Cup - Video 

This is what Medic does with Archimedes.

1 day ago
8,171 notes
Reblog

+ burd